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Scientific sources on the stigma of people with mental health issues   Ask me anything   Submit
Reblogged from atmagaialove

atmagaialove:

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(via i---ickk)

Reblogged from 8bitfuture

8bitfuture:

Photos: Mammoth skeleton unearthed.

A Texas family business has discovered a ‘90% complete’ mammoth skeleton in their gravel pit, after striking a 6ft long tusk with an excavator.

The find has been donated to the nearby Perot Museum, which is working to remove the skeleton, which is estimated to be a 9ft (2.7m) tall female which died between 20,000 to 60,000 years ago.

(Source: Daily Mail, via sagansense)

Reblogged from kqedscience

kqedscience:

Scientists Study How We Evolved To Stand On Our Own Two Fins

"Scientists examining an unusual African fish that can walk and breathe air think they’ve learned a thing or two about how our distant ancestors made the leap from the oceans to terra firma some 400 million years ago.

The modern fish they studied is called Polypterus senegalus, which has both gills and lungs and as well as a remarkable ability to use its pectoral fins for locomotion.”

Learn more from NPR.

(via sagansense)

Reblogged from psicologicamenteblog
Reblogged from mindblowingscience
mindblowingscience:

IN AUTISM, BRAIN DOESN’T ‘PRUNE’ EXTRA SYNAPSES
Neurons in brains from people with autism do not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from unaffected brains (top) and brains from autistic patients (bottom); the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses. (Credit: Guomei Tang, Mark S. Sonders/CUMC)

Neuroscientists have discovered extra synapses in the brains of children and adolescents with autism. The excess is due to a slowdown in the normal brain “pruning” process during development, they say.
Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions. The study appears online in the journal Neuron.
A drug that restores normal synaptic pruning can improve autistic-like behaviors in mice, the researchers found, even when the drug is given after the behaviors appear.
“This is an important finding that could lead to a novel and much-needed therapeutic strategy for autism,” says Jeffrey Lieberman, professor and chair of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, who was not involved in the study.
Although the drug, rapamycin, has side effects that may preclude its use in people with autism, “the fact that we can see changes in behavior suggests that autism may still be treatable after a child is diagnosed, if we can find a better drug,” says the study’s senior investigator, David Sulzer, professor of neurobiology at CUMC.
During normal brain development, a burst of synapse formation occurs in infancy, particularly in the cortex, a region involved in autistic behaviors; pruning eliminates about half of these cortical synapses by late adolescence.
Scientists know that many genes linked to autism affect synapses, and some researchers have hypothesized that people with autism may have more synapses.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

IN AUTISM, BRAIN DOESN’T ‘PRUNE’ EXTRA SYNAPSES

Neurons in brains from people with autism do not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from unaffected brains (top) and brains from autistic patients (bottom); the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses. (Credit: Guomei Tang, Mark S. Sonders/CUMC)

Neuroscientists have discovered extra synapses in the brains of children and adolescents with autism. The excess is due to a slowdown in the normal brain “pruning” process during development, they say.

Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions. The study appears online in the journal Neuron.

A drug that restores normal synaptic pruning can improve autistic-like behaviors in mice, the researchers found, even when the drug is given after the behaviors appear.

“This is an important finding that could lead to a novel and much-needed therapeutic strategy for autism,” says Jeffrey Lieberman, professor and chair of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, who was not involved in the study.

Although the drug, rapamycin, has side effects that may preclude its use in people with autism, “the fact that we can see changes in behavior suggests that autism may still be treatable after a child is diagnosed, if we can find a better drug,” says the study’s senior investigator, David Sulzer, professor of neurobiology at CUMC.

During normal brain development, a burst of synapse formation occurs in infancy, particularly in the cortex, a region involved in autistic behaviors; pruning eliminates about half of these cortical synapses by late adolescence.

Scientists know that many genes linked to autism affect synapses, and some researchers have hypothesized that people with autism may have more synapses.

Continue Reading.

(via shychemist)

Reblogged from questionall
questionall:

WHAT IS MORE LIKELY? Over 50 countries around the world ban GMO crop cultivation and/or at least label GMO foods and ingredients so their people have the freedom to choose. On the other hand, Monsanto is fighting tooth and nail against mandatory labeling and county-by-county GMO crop cultivation bans in the United States. Why are they trying to hide their GMOs from the public?

Colorado and Oregon voters have the opportunity to make mandatory GMO labeling the law this November at the polls, and to stick it to Monsanto, the agrichemical industry, Big Food and Big Ag. Colorado. Oregon. Make it happen.

Help out - volunteer, donate and vote. Beat the corporate interests this November:

COLORADO YES ON 105http://www.righttoknowcolorado.org/
Right To Know Colorado - GMO

OREGON YES ON 92http://oregonrighttoknow.org/
Oregon Right To Know

questionall:

WHAT IS MORE LIKELY? Over 50 countries around the world ban GMO crop cultivation and/or at least label GMO foods and ingredients so their people have the freedom to choose. On the other hand, Monsanto is fighting tooth and nail against mandatory labeling and county-by-county GMO crop cultivation bans in the United States. Why are they trying to hide their GMOs from the public?

Colorado and Oregon voters have the opportunity to make mandatory GMO labeling the law this November at the polls, and to stick it to Monsanto, the agrichemical industry, Big Food and Big Ag. Colorado. Oregon. Make it happen.

Help out - volunteer, donate and vote. Beat the corporate interests this November:

COLORADO YES ON 105
http://www.righttoknowcolorado.org/
Right To Know Colorado - GMO

OREGON YES ON 92
http://oregonrighttoknow.org/
Oregon Right To Know

Reblogged from natskep
natskep:

Visit http://natskep.com - We should have a Death Star by now.
Thanks christianity. 
#atheist #atheism #agnostic #atheistposts #freethinker #godless #god #faith #religion #conservative  #godsnotdead #wefuckingloveatheism #wefuckinglovescience #legendaryleagueoflogic

natskep:

Visit http://natskep.com - We should have a Death Star by now.
Thanks christianity.
#atheist #atheism #agnostic #atheistposts #freethinker #godless #god #faith #religion #conservative #godsnotdead #wefuckingloveatheism #wefuckinglovescience #legendaryleagueoflogic