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Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove
scienceyoucanlove:

Fact of the Day:The giant squid, or Architeuthis dux as it’s scientifically known, has a complex yet small donut-shaped brain. The squid’s oesophagus runs through the ‘donut-hole’ of the brain making it essential for food to be ground into small pieces by it’s notorious beak.Read more about this fascinating creature herewww.ocean.si.edu/giant-squid (Graphic via funnyjunk.com)
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Fact of the Day:
The giant squid, or Architeuthis dux as it’s scientifically known, has a complex yet small donut-shaped brain. The squid’s oesophagus runs through the ‘donut-hole’ of the brain making it essential for food to be ground into small pieces by it’s notorious beak.
Read more about this fascinating creature herewww.ocean.si.edu/giant-squid 
(Graphic via funnyjunk.com)

source 

(via twistedlandstourguide)

Reblogged from questionall

This is called the Gooty Sapphire Ornamental Tree Spider (Poecilotheria metallica) and even its name is all fancy. They’re insanely rare, too, only being found in a single location which is severely fragmented. The extent of occurrence is less than 100 km2. Habitat: Southeastern India and Sri Lanka Status: Critically Endangered

This is called the Gooty Sapphire Ornamental Tree Spider (Poecilotheria metallica) and even its name is all fancy. They’re insanely rare, too, only being found in a single location which is severely fragmented. The extent of occurrence is less than 100 km2. Habitat: Southeastern India and Sri Lanka Status: Critically Endangered

Reblogged from kqedscience
kqedscience:

Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain"Ani Patel, an associate professor of psychology at Tufts University and the author of “Music, Language, and the Brain,” says that while listening to music can be relaxing and contemplative, the idea that simply plugging in your iPod is going to make you more intelligent doesn’t quite hold up to scientific scrutiny.“On the other hand,” Patel says, “there’s now a growing body of work that suggests that actually learning to play a musical instrument does have impacts on other abilities.” These include speech perception, the ability to understand emotions in the voice and the ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously.”
Learn more from KQED’s MindShift blog.

kqedscience:

Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain

"Ani Patel, an associate professor of psychology at Tufts University and the author of “Music, Language, and the Brain,” says that while listening to music can be relaxing and contemplative, the idea that simply plugging in your iPod is going to make you more intelligent doesn’t quite hold up to scientific scrutiny.

“On the other hand,” Patel says, “there’s now a growing body of work that suggests that actually learning to play a musical instrument does have impacts on other abilities.” These include speech perception, the ability to understand emotions in the voice and the ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously.”

Learn more from KQED’s MindShift blog.

(via silas216)

Reblogged from kqedscience
kqedscience:

64 Percent of Women Scientists Say They’ve Been Sexually Harassed Doing Field Work
“Most women working in the sciences face sexual assault and harassment while conducting field work, according to a study released Wednesday that is the first to investigate the subject.
The report surveyed 516 women (and 142 men) working in various scientific fields, including archeology, anthropology, and biology. Sixty-four percent of the women said they had been sexually harassed while working at field sites, and one out of five said they had been victims of sexual assault. The study found that the harassers and assailants were usually supervisors. Ninety percent of the women who were harassed were young undergraduates, post-graduates, or post-doctoral students.”
Read more from motherjones.

kqedscience:

64 Percent of Women Scientists Say They’ve Been Sexually Harassed Doing Field Work

Most women working in the sciences face sexual assault and harassment while conducting field work, according to a study released Wednesday that is the first to investigate the subject.

The report surveyed 516 women (and 142 men) working in various scientific fields, including archeology, anthropology, and biology. Sixty-four percent of the women said they had been sexually harassed while working at field sites, and one out of five said they had been victims of sexual assault. The study found that the harassers and assailants were usually supervisors. Ninety percent of the women who were harassed were young undergraduates, post-graduates, or post-doctoral students.”

Read more from motherjones.

(via silas216)

Reblogged from kqedscience
kqedscience:

Discovery Of ‘Electric Bacteria’ Hints At The Potential For Alien Life
“Microbiologists have learned that certain strains of bacteria are capable of using energy in its purest form by eating and breathing electrons. It’s a discovery that demonstrates an entirely new mode of life on Earth — and possibly beyond.”
Learn more from io9. 

kqedscience:

Discovery Of ‘Electric Bacteria’ Hints At The Potential For Alien Life

Microbiologists have learned that certain strains of bacteria are capable of using energy in its purest form by eating and breathing electrons. It’s a discovery that demonstrates an entirely new mode of life on Earth — and possibly beyond.”

Learn more from io9. 

(via silas216)

Reblogged from phroyd
phroyd:

Called the Tree of 40 Fruit, this tree produces an array of stone fruit varieties including plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and almonds, every year. Sixteen of these trees are now growing in the US.
Phroyd

phroyd:

Called the Tree of 40 Fruit, this tree produces an array of stone fruit varieties including plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and almonds, every year. Sixteen of these trees are now growing in the US.

Phroyd

Reblogged from neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

How does the cerebellum work?
Nothing says “don’t mess with me” like a deeply-fissured cortex. Even the sharpest jaws and claws in the animal kingdom are worthless without some serious thought muscle under the hood. But beneath the highly convoluted membrane covering the brains of the evolutionary upper crust hides the original crumpled processor—the cerebellum. How this organ might actually work is the subject of a review published in Frontiers of Systems Neuroscience by researchers at the University of Minnesota.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

How does the cerebellum work?

Nothing says “don’t mess with me” like a deeply-fissured cortex. Even the sharpest jaws and claws in the animal kingdom are worthless without some serious thought muscle under the hood. But beneath the highly convoluted membrane covering the brains of the evolutionary upper crust hides the original crumpled processor—the cerebellum. How this organ might actually work is the subject of a review published in Frontiers of Systems Neuroscience by researchers at the University of Minnesota.

Read more

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

Reblogged from quotefinity
quotefinity:

Click (http://quotefinity.tumblr.com) for our quote archive

quotefinity:

Click (http://quotefinity.tumblr.com) for our quote archive

(via iammyfather)

Reblogged from questionall